7 Reasons Why We Should be Praying for the Supreme Court This Week

This morning I went to the steps of the Supreme Court to be present in case the Court rules on Proposition 8 and Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) cases. The court chose not to rule today but it will issue decisions in both cases this week (as early as tomorrow but probably no later than Thursday).

Just in case the importance of the moment has not sunken in, allow me to briefly review why we should all be praying for good decisions from the Supreme Court this week — because this is what is at stake:

Screen shot 2013-06-24 at 4.21.08 PM1) This could be the Roe v. Wade of marriage. The Supreme Court could conceivably rule that language protecting marriage in the state constitutions of over 30 states (approved by the votes of over 60 million Americans) are “unconstitutional.” While unlikely, this is a real fear, and so we must pray that the Court instead recognizes the truth of marriage — that is the unique union of one man and one woman.

2) A broad ruling in favor of redefining marriage could put into law the false (but “legal”) norm that those of us who believe in marriage as the unique union of one man and one woman are guilty of holding “animus” towards gay people. We would thus find ourselves the legal equivalent of racist bigots before our own Constitution and state and federal laws. This is again reason to pray that the Court upholds the rights of pro-marriage Americans this week.

3) A broad ruling in favor of redefining marriage would be represent the most urgent threat to the religious freedom of pro-marriage Catholics and other Christians we have ever witnessed in this country. Countries that have redefined marriage (think Canada) are actively and aggressively fining and imprisoning Christian pastors and Catholic priests and bishops who continue to speak the truth about marriage and human sexuality from the pulpit. Stories like the ones told on the Marriage Anti-Defamation Alliance website reveal that private citizens will also see their rights and livelihoods threatened.

4) A broad ruling in favor of redefining marriage would put at risk, in one fell swoop, every Catholic and conservative christian adoption agency in America that only adopts children into married (heterosexual) households. Where marriage has been redefined on a state level or where same-sex civil unions have been passed without explicit and robust religious freedom language, Catholic, Lutheran and other Christian denomination-run adoption and foster care agencies have been forced to shutter their doors or face crippling lawsuits and penalties. This has happened already in Washington, D.C., Massachussetts and Illinois, to name a few states.

5) What the Supreme Court decides will echo around the world. In other countries there are insurgent movements in support of marriage (witness the millions of French citizens who have poured into the streets of Paris week after week in defense of marriage) — but these nascent efforts will be set back if the United States Supreme Court rules that the institution of marriage somehow contradicts our Constitution. As on the issue of life, we know from experience that what happens in America does not just stay in America — it effects the rest of the world. Therefore we have a great responsibility to hold fast to the truth of marriage both here and for the rest of the world.

6) A win at the Supreme Court for gay marriage activists will embolden them to expand their campaign against people of faith and those who disagree with them. Some of us have given in to the lie that if we just cede the ground on marriage, that will end this contentious debate. The opposite is true. Currently a huge amount of resources and cultural heft is being waged against annihilating marriage. These same forces will turn their activism to combating other goods once they have overthrown our commonsense definition of marriage. We must stand on marriage or else stand on ever-shifting and more-shaky ground.

7) … last but not least, redefining marriage really will harm the institution and therefore harm the people whom marriage serves. Channeling through the formative power of the law the false notion that children do not deserve a mother and father, and that marriage is nothing more than the emotional and temporary union of any two consenting adults, will harm society. Untruths such as the “pro-choice” and “no fault divorce” movement told lies that convinced much of the public in their time — it is only now, decades later, that we are experiencing the full negative brunt of the damage these agendas have wreaked — especially on the poor and vulnerable.

Let’s not recreate the same mistakes today — let’s stand for marriage now and always.

So please, pray for the Supreme Court this week. And join me in testifying to the truth of marriage.

May God preserve marriage and give us, and the Court, the courage to stand for it.

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12 thoughts on “7 Reasons Why We Should be Praying for the Supreme Court This Week

  1. James Layne says:

    I love your website, and please don’t take my comment as being overly picky. I think, however, it’s important to make this distinction. You wrote “we must pray that the Court instead recognizes the truth of marriage — that is the unique union of one man and one woman.”

    I must disagree. It is simply not the role of the Court to be the final arbiter of the meaning of marriage. That is in our constitutional system and traditions a state issue. The point of deferring to the states is that it’s outside the very competence of the federal government, including the judicial branch, to make a ruling on the fundamental institutions of domestic society.

    Now I understand there is also a strong Catholic natural law argument that marriage can’t be defined even by a state any other way than as betwen a man and a woman. But that’s another issue. The one I am commenting upon is the role of the Court.

  2. Joe Carlin says:

    All we need to do is look to Oregon, where voters went to the polls to pass a constitutional amendment preserving marriage between a man and a woman, and now bakers and florists are being persecuted for their religious beliefs! Therefore, we should repeal all amendments regardless marriage in order to preserve our religious liberties!!!!

  3. I will pray twice as hard for our religious freedom. Marriage is strickly between a man and women. Lets keep our rights in place. Only man and women can produce an infant. Anything else is a falsehood.

  4. Bill says:

    Patrick, an adoption agency (any adoption agency, not just Catholic) should be able to make decisions that are in the best interests of the children. Adoption is about putting children into a safe, healthy home where they can grow up in a stable environment. It is not about satisfying the desires of adults. This might indeed mean, as it does now, that an agency would not place children into troubled homes, with single parents, or with parents who have ongoing drug, alcohol, or mental problems. Is this discrimination? Yes. Is it reasonable and in the best interest of the child? Yes. Would it be reasonable for an agency to not place a child into a home with a same-sex couple? Yes. Is an agency free to place children into homes with same-sex couples? Yes. There is no infringement on same-sex couples, but there certainly is on the right of the children to grow up with a genetically female mother and a genetically male father.

  5. Patrick says:

    Teep,

    Do you think a Catholic adoption agency should be able to discriminate against divorced people? That is, “Policy: we will not adopt out a child to anyone who has been divorced.” Isn’t it the same analysis?

    Company A takes uses tax dollars to run a business that discriminates against X% of the population, based on the particular religious beliefs of the people who run Company A.

  6. Teep Schlachter says:

    All those enumerated points are true causes for concern. Many will say in the combox, no doubt, that a ruling against DOMA and Prop 8 both would not threaten religious freedom, the cultural significance of marriage, or the ability of religious groups to run adoption agencies. If number 6 on your list should prove true, then, I submit that the rest of these will follow. Pray indeed.

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