Advocates for Women Bishops Rejoiced as Five More Anglican Bishops Join Catholic Ordinariate [Updated]

UPDATE — I missed that this article is a year old. But I think my observations about the trends still stand.

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Traditional Anglican bishops leaving the Church of England and joining the Roman Catholic Church’s Ordinariate as advocates for female bishops simultaneously push for (and rejoice over) their departure:

Advocates for women bishops last night welcomed the resignation of five Anglican bishops to the Catholic Church saying their departure should help quicken the arrival of full equality within the Church of England.

The five bishops, three of whom are still working bishops, have left the Church of England following prolonged disagreement over the consecration of women bishops, an issue which has bitterly divided the Anglican Church. [The UK Independent]

The lines dividing the orthodox See of Rome (which continues to follow the apostolic tradition) and the ever-splintering doctrinal disputes of post-modern protestantism become clearer yet.

I think the creation of the Ordinariate will have far wider-reaching impacts than simply on those souls it directly effects. The existence of the Ordinariate and the possibility of similar structures being erected in the future changes the inter-denomination debate of protestant churches and ecclesial communities where some members desire to retain and fully live-out the core traditions of Christianity. In other words, the Ordinariate does not just change the Roman Catholic experience, it transforms the debates going on within mainline Anglican and protestant communions as well.

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11 thoughts on “Advocates for Women Bishops Rejoiced as Five More Anglican Bishops Join Catholic Ordinariate [Updated]

  1. bpeters1 says:

    Thomas – two questions, posed out of curiosity. (i.) Why not capitalize “Protestant” and “Protestantism”? Doing so is the mainstream accepted style of composition, and going lowercase seems like a “dig” at them. Is it meant as such, or is there another reason? If the former, it seems unnecessarily polemical. (ii.) Your post speaks of “protestant churches and ecclesial communities.” Do you recognize the existence of Protestant “churches” (as opposed to “ecclesial communities”)? The CDF’s “Responses to Some Questions” (2007) gave me the impression that since they lack “valid orders,” all Protestant (as well as, I would assume, if Leo XIII is taken at face value, Anglican) groups are to be designated “ecclesial communities” rather than “churches.” Since you make the distinction between the two terms and apply them both to Protestants, it gives the impression that you recognize the existence of Protestant “churches,” something which surprised me given your typical deference to all things CDF. (I’d be happy to have my reading of the note corrected if it should be read otherwise!)

    1. Bruce says:

      indeed, protestant communities do not have valid orders, and that includes the anglicans as well. we pray that our wayward brothers and sisters come to their senses with the help of the Holy Spirit, and return home to the one, true Church – the Catholic Church.

  2. Michael Gray, CPA says:

    Each controversy, such as ordination of women, ordination of avowed homosexuals, and blessing of same-sex marriages, opens the eyes of a number of protestant believers. These believers continually leave churches that have put their wills above God’s. We come to the Roman Catholic Church because it alone is faithful to God’s will.

  3. Pete Gibson says:

    This story is from November 2010, isn’t it?

    1. Thomas Peters says:

      Pete, yes you’re right. I’ll revise my post.

  4. Mathew says:

    The lines dividing the orthodox Sea of Rome (which continues to follow the apostolic tradition) and the ever-splintering doctrinal disputes of post-modern protestantism become clearer yet.

    I think you mean See of Rome, not sea…

    1. Thomas Peters says:

      thanks, I still make this mistake when composing fast. :)

  5. Bruce says:

    Well, heresies tend to run around 500 years, give or take a century or two. The C of E and Protestantism in general are about done – in their death throes at the very least.

  6. jonoshea1 says:

    Check the date on the article. It’s over one year old. It’s referring to those five former Anglican bishops who entered the Ordinariate at the beginning of this year.

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