Desmond Tutu says he would rather go to hell than worship a “homophobic” God

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Last Friday the United Nations announced a “global outreach campaign” aimed at combating what it believes is “anti-gay violence and repression.” According to CBS News, the goal of the initiative is to “change public attitudes around the world on [LGBT] issues that have bitterly divided the U.N.’s own member states.”

desmond tutu

To show the global community that it should support the project, the U.N. has enlisted the help of Desmond Tutu. While expressing his admiration for the measure, which is really just a global re-education program aimed at indoctrinating developing countries with secularist thinking, Tutu said that “I would not worship a God who is homophobic…I would refuse to go to a homophobic heaven. No, I would say sorry, I mean I would much rather go to the other place.”

Wow. Really, Mr. Tutu? You have that much pride? You are that stubborn? You are a Christian, right? You do have a brain, yes? Do you have any clue as to what hell is like? If not, here are just a few people who have seen what goes on there. I pray you’ll re-think what you said and that you ask God for forgiveness.

Teresa of Avila:

While I was at prayer one day, I found myself in a moment, without knowing how, plunged apparently into Hell. I understood that the Lord wanted me to see the place the devils had prepared there for me and which I merited because of my sins.

The entrance it seems to me was similar to a very long and narrow alleyway, like an oven, low and dark and confined; the floor seemed to me to consist of dirty, muddy water emitting foul stench and swarming with putrid vermin. At the end of the alleyway a hole that looked like a small cupboard was hollowed out in the wall; there I found I was placed in a cramped condition.

My bodily sufferings were unendurable but these sufferings were nothing in comparison with the anguish of my soul, a sense of oppression, of stifling, and of pain so acute, accompanied by so hopeless and cruel an infliction, that I know not how to speak of it. If I say that the soul is continually being torn from the body it would be nothing – for that implies the destruction of life by the hands of another – but here it is the soul itself that is tearing itself in pieces. I cannot describe that inward fire or that despair, surpassing all torments and all pain. I did not see who it was that tormented me, but I felt myself on fire, and torn to pieces, as it seemed to me; and I repeat it, this inward fire and despair are the greatest torments of all.

Lucia Santos and Francisco and Jacinta Marto:

She opened Her hands once more, as She had done the two previous months. The rays [of light]appeared to penetrate the earth, and we saw, as it were, a vast sea of fire. Plunged in this fire were demons and souls in human form, like transparent burning embers, all blackened or burnished bronze, floating about in the conflagration, now raised into the air by the flames that issued from within themselves together with great clouds of smoke, now falling back on every side like sparks in huge fires, without weight or equilibrium, amid shrieks and groans of pain and despair, which horrified us and made us tremble with fright. The demons were distinguished [from the souls of the damned]by their terrifying and repellent likeness to frightful and unknown animals, black and transparent like burning coals.

Sister Josefa Menendez:

dante

My soul fell into abysmal depths, the bottom of which cannot be seen, for it is immense. Then I was pushed into one of those fiery cavities and pressed, as it were, between burning planks, and sharp nails and red-hot irons seemed to be piercing my flesh. I felt as if they were endeavoring to pull out my tongue, but could not. This torture reduced me to such agony that my very eyes seemed to be starting out of their sockets. I think this was because of the fire which burns, burns. . . not a finger nail escapes terrifying torments, and all the time one cannot move even a finger to gain some relief, not change posture, for the body seems flattened out and [yet]doubled in two. Sounds of confusion and blasphemy cease not for an instant. A sickening stench asphyxiates and corrupts everything, it is like the burning of putrefied flesh, mingled with tar and sulfur. . . a mixture to which nothing on earth can be compared. . . although these tortures were terrific, they would be bearable if the soul were at peace. But it suffers indescribably. . . All I have written,” she concluded, “is but a shadow of what the soul suffers, for no words can express such dire tormet.

St. Faustina of Poland

Today, I was led by an angel to the chasms of hell. It is a place of great torture; how awesomely large and extensive it is! The kinds of tortures I saw: the first torture that constitutes hell is the loss of God; the second is perpetual remorse of conscience; the third is that one’s condition will never change; the fourth is the fire that will penetrate the soul without destroying it – a terrible suffering, since it is a purely spiritual fire, lit by God’s anger; the fifth torture is continual darkness and a terrible suffocating smell, and, despite the darkness, the devils and the souls of the damned see each other and all the evil, both of others and their own; the sixth torture is the constant company of Satan; the seventh torture is the horrible despair, hatred of God, vile words, curses and blasphemies. These are the tortures suffered by all the damned together, but that is not the end of the sufferings. There are special tortures destined for particular souls. These are the torments of the senses. Each soul undergoes terrible and indescribable sufferings, related to the manner in which it has sinned. There are caverns and pits of torture where one form of agony differs from another.

The views expressed here are those of the author, and do not necessarily represent the views of CatholicVote.org

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About Author

Stephen Kokx is a freelance writer and adjunct professor of political science living in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He has previously worked for the Archdiocese of Chicago's Office for Peace and Justice. His writing on religion, politics and Catholic social teaching has appeared in a number of outlets, including Crisis Magazine, The American Thinker and his hometown paper The Grand Rapids Press. He is a member of the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars and the Society of Catholic Social Scientists, and is a graduate of Aquinas College and Loyola University Chicago. Follow Stephen on twitter @StephenKokx

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