Jobs, Food Stamp, and Disability Numbers Don’t Lie.

Obama isn’t working.

And neither are 36.5 percent of able-bodied workers in this country.

Today comes news that more people were added to the food stamp roles AND more people were added to disability roles than found jobs earlier this year.

This chart is from the Senate Budget Committee:

This is not how it was supposed to be. Some can (and will) bleat about “obstructionist republicans,” but the Republicans only hold one portion of the government, and that only since January 2011. President Obama got his nearly $1 trillion “stimulus” package passed in March of 2009, partly on the merits of the original version of this graph:

The light blue line is what Obama and his crack team of economists predicted would be the worst case scenario unemployment rate if the Stimulus did not pass. The darker blue line is what they promised us it would be if the Stimulus did pass. And the red dots… well, they’re reality. That’s a mighty wide gap there, and well above even the worst case scenario figure.

Bonus: see the green dot in the corner with “11%” next to it? The note with it says that that’s what the unemployment rate would have been in July 2012 if the number of people in the job market were the same as it was when the Stimulus passed. Just to twist that knife a little: that number has gotten worse since July because thousands more people have given up and left the job market.

People want to work. People want to earn their way and provide for themselves and their families. “Redistribution” as a basis for an economy breeds resentment, greed, apathy, and a great flattening of society. Even those who want to work for their living and hate the idea of becoming dependent on government programs can find themselves becoming comfortable, or at least dependent, on those programs. Then they run the risk of losing government benefits (that are very possibly not as good as what they would get from a regular job, but are at least reliable) if they pursue independence. Not an easy place to be. We owe it to ourselves and our fellow Americans to reject the overbearing regulatory state and redistributionist policies that are throttling private sector job growth and lulling millions into a government-subsidized complacency.

I’ll close with this: I must dispute one more thing Obama said the other day on Univision. He claimed that his greatest failure was not passing comprehensive immigration reform. While technically true that he and Congress did not work out a comprehensive immigration reform package, the President’s economic policies may preclude the problem: with jobs trends like this the flow of immigrants may just dry up on its own.

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2 thoughts on “Jobs, Food Stamp, and Disability Numbers Don’t Lie.

  1. “While technically true that he and Congress did not work out a comprehensive immigration reform package, the President’s economic policies may preclude the problem: with jobs trends like this the flow of immigrants may just dry up on its own.”

    This has actually already happened. Since the economic collapse of 2008, immigration from Mexico and central America has come to a comparative “screeching halt,” with more people crossing back into Mexico than coming into the USA for the first time since 1930:

    http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Mexican-migration-to-U-S-at-standstill-3504296.php

    Along with the the statistics presented in this article, I would argue that the lack of immigration into the USA since 2008 is yet another sign that Obama’s economic agenda is a failure. If illegal/undocumented immigrants (many of whom come from a poverty that is unthinkable in even the poorest US neighborhood) no longer think that the grass is greener in America – and indeed, are even choosing to return to their previously forsaken homeland – then the American economy truly is in dire straights.

  2. So much for ‘hope and change’.

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