Poll shows support for Chris Christie

Gallup polled Republican voters with the names of 12 different people thought to considering a presidential run in 2012.

The poll includes the names you would suspect. Mitt Romney (unfortunately) leads the pack with 19%, followed by Sarah Palin at 16, Mike Huckabee at 12, and Newt Gingrich at 9 percent. Ron Paul got 5th place, ahead of both Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour and Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty.

But Matt Lewis at Politics Daily noted something astonishing in the Gallup Poll findings. According to Gallup:

In addition to the 12 named candidates, 1 percent of respondents volunteered the name of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. Christie, in his first year as governor of the state, has become a prominent GOP figure, though he is not expected to run for president in 2012.

Wow. That’s just amazing. You give people 12 choices and they say, “Nah, got someone better in mind.” Have to admit, I agree with them. Chris Christie is the real deal.

I imagine the pollsters will start to include Governor Christie when they ask next time.

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6 thoughts on “Poll shows support for Chris Christie

  1. John says:

    This is sad. How does barely 1% for Christie among much higher support for others constitute “support for Christie”?

    I’m still looking for the “Catholic” supporters of Christie to explain how his 8/23/2010 appointment of a gay marriage supporter, Joan Rivitz, to the state civil rights commission, should endear him to Catholics

    The Christie sychophants are working in overdrive.

    1. Howard says:

      Precisely. So, he’s apparently sometimes pro-life. Frankly, he is unreliable. Did he make the appointment because he does not truly believe “gay marriage” is inherently wrong, or because he does not have the fortitude to stand up for what he believes? Who cares? In either event, he is unworthy of support. Sure, there are worse politicians out there, but it’s utter foolishness to get excited about someone who is clearly unreliable on natural law issues.

  2. George says:

    I recently became aware of Gov. Christie and am impressed. Is there any effort to get Ed Schultz of MSNBC fired after he called Christie “a cold-hearted big fat slob?

  3. Howard says:

    My first comment seems to have gotten lost, perhaps because I took too long to write it. Here it is again.

    I’m not convinced. To be frank, though, it would take a lot to make me think a prominent Republican is worthy of my vote. (I can no longer even imagine circumstances that would make me consider a prominent Democrat worthy of my vote.)

    When I look at a presidential candidate, I basically consider only a few things.

    1. Does the candidate know what problems face the nation today? If he only knows about the economy and al Qaeda, he only sees the tip of the iceberg. There are bigger problems with (to name a few) sexual morality (not a joke), the absence of a culture of learning (as distinct from state-supported education), and the strategic, economic, and cultural risk of increasing dependence on foreign industry.

    2. Does the candidate have an appropriate prioritization of the national problems? If he really thinks a capital gains tax is an evil on par with abortion, the answer is clearly NO.

    3. Is the candidate a good leader?
    (a) Does he explain in a convincing way the true nature of our most important national problems?
    (b) Does he have a reasonable plan for addressing those problems, and can he present it in a compelling way?
    (c) Is he willing to use the lawful powers of his office to tackle those problems, or will he only use them to gain popularity and inflate his campaign war chest?
    (d) Is he willing to sacrifice his career, if necessary, for the good of the country?

  4. Howard says:

    I’m not convinced. To be frank, though, it would take a lot to make me think a prominent Republican is worthy of my vote. (I can no longer even imagine circumstances that would make me consider a prominent Democrat worthy of my vote.)

    When I look at a presidential candidate, I basically consider only a few things.

    1. Does the candidate know what problems face the nation today? If he only knows about the economy and al Qaeda, he only sees the tip of the iceberg. There are bigger problems with (to name a few) sexual morality (not a joke), the absence of a culture of learning (as distinct from state-supported education), and the strategic, economic, and cultural risk of increasing dependence on foreign industry.

    2. Does the candidate have an appropriate prioritization of the national problems? If he really thinks a capital gains tax is an evil on par with abortion, the answer is clearly NO.

    3. Is the candidate a good leader?
    (a) Does he explain in a convincing way the true nature of our most important national problems?
    (b) Does he have a reasonable plan for addressing those problems, and can he present it in a compelling way?
    (c) Is he willing to use the lawful powers of his office to tackle those problems, or will he only use them to gain popularity and inflate his campaign war chest?
    (d) Is he willing to sacrifice his career, if necessary, for the good of the country?

  5. Sr_Lisa says:

    I agree with the Christie findings…He’s absolutely solid leadership material, but he needs to fight it out in NJ and earn govt leadership experience. I agree with Christie, too, that he has made a commitment to the people of NJ to serve as governor. He will not win in 2012 if he pulls out of his current role. I predict, though, if he manages to pull NJ out of the fiscal dumpster, his platform is set, and it will say a lot about his policies and how the nation could benefit from the same. He’s young and will be around in 2016.

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