Nine Questions About the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue

One of the major events in American popular culture, it seems, is the annual release of Sports Illustrated‘s Swimsuit Edition.  It invariably generates a lot of media attention, and many men seem to think of it as a kind of highlight of the year.

Herewith a few questions on this cultural phenomeon:

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  • 1. What percentage of the Swimsuit Edition’s consumers are American Catholic men?
  • 2. What percentage of the Swimsuit Edition’s consumers are married American Catholic men?
  • 3. What, really, is the difference between the Swimsuit Edition and pornography?
  • 4. Or, to put it another way, what motive is there to look at the Swimsuit Edition that would be different from the motive for looking at pornography?
  • 5. If you can identify a theoretical motive for looking at it different from the motive for looking at pornography, how likely is it that that theoretical motive would really be the actual motive inducing you to look at it?
  • 6. Would your grandfather have approved of the Swimsuit Edition?
  • 7. Would your grandmother have approved of the Swimsuit Edition?
  • 8. Are you aware that in the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus (who Catholics believe is the Son of God) said this: “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’  But I say to you that every one who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her in his heart’”?
  • 9. How likely is it that Jesus would have said this, and his disciples would have been careful to record it, if he had not meant it to be taken seriously?
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Categories:Culture

32 thoughts on “Nine Questions About the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue

  1. Captain America says:

    The swimsuit issue is meant to boost subscription sales during a slow sports time of the year, and, frankly, it is outdated. Particularly in this era of internet porn, and just outright commercial porn on television.

    Why don’t women complain?

  2. David Eckel says:

    Q1. I don’t know
    Q2. I don’t know
    Q3. From my own tragic experience: None. Q4. I have never been able to think of one. Q5. Extremely likely. Q6. Never knew my Grandfathers well enough. Q7. Maternal Grandmother would NOT have approved. Q8. Painfully aware. Q9. The answer is self-evident from my perspective: extremely likely.

  3. Elizabeth says:

    I amti red of seeing this issue promoted as a celebration of a healthy female physique. Thanks for taking on the (thoroughly un)hidden agenda!

  4. Sylvia says:

    And, the same can be said for Victoria’s Secret. How many Catholic women shop and support it? I don’t understand why they do.

  5. rufus says:

    This issue proves that men are thinking with that thing between their legs….would this be something you would look at sitting on the couch next to your mother?

  6. Karamazov says:

    I have a similar question, though it does not expressly deal with the swimsuit edition of Sports Illustrated. Instead, it plays off your third question concerning pornography. “If prostitution is illegal why then is video pornography legal when in both cases they necessarily involve the paying of people to have sex? In fact, both seem to be properly described as ‘the paying of people to have sex for the enjoyment of others.’”

    1. Sean Argir says:

      Pornography is legal when it is regulated. Prostitution is not regulated except in Nevada were some prostitution is legal.

      Unregulated porn and prostitution is illegal.

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